Postal Inspectors Provide Valuable Tips For Holiday Package Safety

WASHINGTON – As the holiday shipping season is here, the United States Postal Inspection Service advises everyone mailing gifts to become educated and play their part to ensure their special packages arrive to their destination safely.

Here are a few tips to consider this holiday season:

  1. Don’t leave your delivered mail and packages unattended. Packages left on front porches and in mailboxes are a tempting target for thieves. Don’t help them by making sure you bring all packages inside your home in a timely manner.
  2. Going out of town? Hold your mail at the post office. Sign up for Hold Mail service on usps.com if you plan on being away from home for a few days. Your letters and packages will be held securely at your post office until you pick them up or request they be delivered to your home.
  3. Plan ahead and ship packages using Hold for Pickup. If you are sending packages, you can choose the Hold for Pickup option on usps.com. The packages will be safely held at the recipient’s local post office until they can pick it up. If you are expecting a package, you can redirect it to your post office by selecting Hold for Pickup using Intercept a Package under Track & Manage on usps.com.
  4. Customize the delivery. If you are expecting something you know will not fit in your mailbox and you won’t be home to receive it, you can authorize the carrier to leave it in a specified location. Visit usps.com, enter the tracking number in Track a Package, and select Delivery Instructions.
  5. Secure the shipment using USPS Special Services. Signature Confirmation helps ensure the package ends up in the right hands by requiring a first initial and last name at the time of delivery. For your most valuable packages, you can opt for Registered Mail service. Registered Mail receives special handling from the time it’s mailed until the time it’s delivered.
  6. Monitor your front door. If you have a home security camera system and you catch any mail thieves in the act, save the video and contact the Postal Inspection Service at 877-876-2455.

For more package security and other related tips, visit www.uspis.gov.

​University Facilities Open or Closed Status

The University of the South concludes the on-campus portion of the fall semester Friday, Nov. 20. While about 40 students might remain on campus during the extended winter break, most College students will be away from Nov. 22 through late January. Classes are planned to start again Feb. 1, 2021.

University offices will be closed for two weeks, from Dec. 21, 2020, to Jan. 4, 2021.

The access to and hours of many university facilities will be adjusted during the break.

During the semester break, hours of operation at the Fowler Center will continue as they are currently.

During the winter break, the Fowler Center indoor tennis courts will be available to Sewanee Tennis Association patrons with access through the exterior doors of the courts. The number of participants is limited to 12 at one time, and current members of the coaching staff must be present.

Access to all other areas of the Fowler Center will continue to be limited to students, faculty, staff, dependents of faculty and staff, and university retirees and their dependents throughout the break.

The Fowler Center will close during the university holiday from the end of the day Sunday, Dec. 20, until Monday, Jan. 4.

duPont Library will remain closed to the public, but books can be borrowed and picked up from the front porch. Closed Dec. 20 to Jan. 4.

The Sewanee Inn is open to the public until Feb. 1, 2021.

Shakerag at the Sewanee Inn will be closed Thanksgiving Day, otherwise is open to the public.

Green’s View Grill is closed on Mondays, and will close from Dec. 21 through Jan. 1. Otherwise it is open with its current hours.

Stirling’s Coffee House will be open from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays from Nov. 30 through Dec. 18, and from Jan. 4 through Jan. 29. Stirling’s will be closed on weekends, and during the university holiday Dec. 21 through Jan. 3. (No walk-up orders; customers must call ahead or use the app.)

McClurg Dining Hall remains limited to students only.

The University Bookstore is open Monday through Saturday; it will be closed Nov. 26 and 27 for Thanksgiving and Dec. 24 and 25 for Christmas.

The SPO will be open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to noon. The SPO will close on Saturdays from Dec. 19 through Jan. 23, and will close for the Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s holidays. Hours will be more limited during the university holiday from Dec. 21 to Jan. 4.

The Sewanee masking mandate will remain in effect. Go to https://new.sewanee.edu/2019-novel-coronavirus-cov... for more information.

IMPORTANT Public Notice from the Town of Monteagle

Correction to Scheduled Monteagle Planning and Zoning Public Hearing Meeting

The public hearing scheduled for Monteagle Planning and Zoning at 5 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 1, at the Monteagle Town Hall, has been changed to a regular monthly meeting at 6 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 1. The Messenger received the notice on Friday, Nov. 20, 2020.

The Messenger received the notice below on Monday, Nov. 23.

​Hartman to Depart University


After nearly 25 years of service to the University of the South—in six roles, including 10 years as dean of students, the institution’s first vice president for risk management and institutional effectiveness, and the first leader of the Emergency Management Executive Team that led the university in the early stages of the pandemic—Eric Hartman is departing the university to pursue opportunities in higher education and management consulting. His duties in risk management will be distributed to other offices.

Hartman and his family will remain in the community, so while the university will lose his leadership, we will not lose him as a caring neighbor. He will continue to serve as board chair for Southern Tennessee Regional Health System-Winchester and as a trustee and chair of the audit committee for St. Andrew’s-Sewanee School through June 2021.

Hartman is most known for his devotion to students and his advocacy for small colleges, receiving national recognition for both. Over the last five years he created an enterprise risk management process that serves as a national model for other institutions. He served on national advisory boards for Culture of Respect and as a senior advisor to their CORE Blueprint to provide a comprehensive approach to addressing sexual violence on U.S. campuses. He has served on the United Educators national advisory board for risk management in educational institutions, and continues to serve on the Steering Committee for the Community-Based Global Learning Collaborative.

Among the many hats he wore on campus, Hartman was the university’s initial Posse liaison and a tireless advocate for theme housing and the integration of health and counseling services to create a Wellness Center, all of which aimed to foster a healthier student climate. He also collaborated with others on the University’s emerging project on human flourishing. He has been the longstanding advisor and producer for the much-loved annual Perpetual Motion production; and he was the first liaison to the Regent’s Committee on Innovation, which is delivering high-speed fiber to leaseholders.

​Virtual Festival of Lessons and Carols

While community members and friends won’t be able to gather in All Saints’ Chapel in person this year, members of the Sewanee community will have access to a digital version of the annual Festival of Lessons and Carols, adapted for the unprecedented circumstances of 2020. Telling the Christmas story of comfort, hope, and God dwelling with us, the video will also provide a look at a semester like no other at Sewanee. The service will be available at https://new.sewanee.edu/campus-life/believing/all-... on Sunday, Dec. 6, at 7 p.m.

​Forever Home for Grundy County Food Bank


by Leslie Lytle, Messenger Staff Writer

For years the Grundy County Food Bank has teetered on the brink of homelessness. Now, thanks to Grundy County Mayor Michael Brady, the food bank will have its first real home, a building constructed and designed with the food bank’s needs in mind. Said Brady, who explored a multitude of options and grant opportunities, “You may get 1,000 ‘no’s,’ but it’s that one ‘yes’ you work for.”

The Grundy County Food Bank is the grocery life-support mechanism for nearly 250 families. The food bank vacated operations at the old Grundy County High School vocational building due to structural issues, Brady said. Since then, the owner of a vacant Tracy City grocery store has allowed the nonprofit to use the building rent free. But the old grocery store has a leaking roof and rotting floors. “The building needs repairs,” said Grundy County Food Bank Director Tim Glover. In addition, Glover said a survey revealed need for a more central location rather than the present site at the county’s edge.

“We looked at prefab buildings and older buildings,” Brady said, but nothing suited. Brady ruled out a school system building due to high costs associated with sharing the space and installing a sprinkler system. Drawing a blank on finding affordable space, Brady applied for a Community Livability grant.

The grant didn’t come through, though. Brady talked to the governor and first lady, pleading the food bank’s case. Given the liability issues of the old grocery, Brady decided to apply for an Imminent Threat grant with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development. Brady got his “yes” at the end of October.

“The engineers are ready to go as soon as the contract is signed,” Brady said. He expects to break ground in late November or early December. The 6,000 square foot building designed by OLG Engineering will have 3,000 square feet dedicated to the food bank, equipped with freezers and coolers. The remaining 3,000 square feet will be for storage and expansion. Glover envisions a kitchen for demonstration and educational purposes, and maybe a soup and salad bay and a chili bay.

The $420,000 grant won’t cover the entire estimated $700,000 construction cost, Brady said. But he stressed the estimate included contingency expenses and material costs had decreased since the building was designed. Brady predicts the project will come in 10-15 percent below the estimate. “We’ll come up with the rest of the money,” Brady said. “We’re extremely close to having the money with no debt on the county.” Brady pointed to industrial development funds that could be used for infrastructure expenses and donations as funding sources.

The county donated the land for the building, a site in Coalmont at the Highway 56 and Highway 108 junction, satisfying the need for a central location. Brady said the simple design, metal and stone, will take six months at the most to complete.

The food bank has changed operations due to the pandemic. “We’ve switched to drive-thru,” Glover said. Formerly clients browsed offerings, selecting items from the various food groups according to their preferences. At the present, clients receive three boxes of groceries which include canned goods, frozen meat, produce, bread, and a small amount of dairy. The USDA has been especially generous with meat this year, according to Glover. Families will receive a Thanksgiving turkey.

What’s missing from the grocery boxes? “We need sugar and flour,” Glover stressed. “It’s rare we have any.” Donations of flour and sugar would be most welcome. Christmas cookies come to mind with the holidays just around the corner. The holiday gift of a forever home is on the way.

​No SUD Rate Increase for 2021


by Leslie Lytle, Messenger Staff Writer

At the Nov. 17 board of commissioners meeting, Sewanee Utility District manager Ben Beavers presented the 2021 budget for approval. Beavers introductory remarks stressed the “uncertainty in our financial outlook.” On the revenue side, “success for this budget depends in great deal on the return of the University to residential learning,” Beavers said. On the expense side, Beavers pointed to forecasted 10-15 percent increases for service and material costs. For 2020, SUD expects to finish the year with water sales revenue 8-10 percent below budget. The 2021 budget anticipates a reduction in water sales revenue, although not as severe as in 2020. Beavers recommended no rate increase for 2021. “We can revisit rates midyear if we need to,” Beavers said. “It’s goodwill for our customers to leave the rates as they are.”

The board unanimously approved the budget. Personnel expenses call for filling a currently vacant employee position when things “pick up.” “We’re watching every penny carefully,” Beavers said. The budget anticipates a decrease in grinder pump expenses. “The grinder pumps we have now are repairable rather than throw-away,” Beavers explained.

Big ticket capital improvement expenses include the following: leak detection equipment and surveys ($25,000); a filtration screen device for the wastewater collection system to prevent wipes and masks from clogging and damaging grinder pumps ($125,000); variable frequency drives for high use pumps to decrease energy consumption ($16,000); infrastructure costs for the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) project to narrow Highway 41A ($201,500).

The University has verbally agreed to help offset SUD expenses for the TDOT project. The Sewanee Village initiative, overseen by Frank Gladu, recommends narrowing the highway to calm traffic and make the south side of the highway more accessible. Gladu plans to retire in January. “He [Gladu] wants to solidify our verbal agreement with the University before he leaves,” Beavers said.

Beavers pointed out nearly 30 percent of the capital improvement budget was dedicated to the road project. Being reimbursed by the University would free up funds for other capital improvements.

In other business, the board approved engaging the MG Group accounting firm to generate a series of reports to assist SUD in long-range planning. The reports will include a 10-year historical review, as well as a monthly oversight report. Savings incurred from releasing the firm currently performing monthly oversight will offset the cost of the 10-year review.

SUD is seeking a SUD customer to serve on the board of commissioners. Those interested in serving should contact Beavers at the SUD office. No petition process is required, only nomination by the board. Final selection will be by the vote of SUD customers. The board will approve a slate of nominees at the Tuesday, Dec. 15 meeting. Voting will begin on the first business day of 2021 at the SUD office and continue until the Tuesday, Jan. 19 commissioners meeting.

​Sewanee Operation Noel — Providing Abundant Holidays for All

In just a few weeks, it will be Christmas. While many are already planning ahead about gifts to buy and food to eat, there are those not so fortunate. In our area, there are children who may not get presents and families that may not have an abundant holiday meal.

Sewanee Operation Noel is a group that was formed many years ago by the Sewanee Volunteer Fire Department (SVFD) to provide help for families in need. They provide food and/or toys during the Christmas season. The SVFD, in conjunction with FROST (Fund Raising Operational Support Team) and the Community Action Committee (CAC), organize the purchasing and distribution of goods.

To be eligible, families must fill out an application. Every family needs to fill out a new application whether you have received from Operation Noel before or not. An application will ensure that the organizers have all the pertinent information in order to provide for everyone in need. The deadline for returning applications is Monday, Dec. 14. Families eligible for Operation Noel must live on top of Sewanee Mountain in the following communities: Sewanee, Midway, Jump Off and on Sherwood Road. Application below.

To make a donation of money, non-perishable food items or new toys, please take items to the Fire Hall or Police Department located behind duPont Library, Print Services located in the old Beta House, or the CAC located at Otey Memorial Parish.

Food and toys will be available for pickup in the large parking lot beside Cravens Hall, 435 Kentucky Ave., on Dec. 23 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Please stay in your vehicle. SVFD and FROST members will be there to assist in loading of the items.

If you have any questions please call 598-3400 and leave a message.



News from the Hospitality Shop

In 1950, pediatrician Dr. Oscar Noel Torian asked a group of Sewanee women to help raise funds to furnish the new Children’s Wing of Hodgson Hospital with necessary supplies. Thus was born the Hospital Children’s Aid League which promptly raised $807 for sheets, spreads, pillow cases, blankets, and diapers. The Children’s Wing and equipment had cost $30,000 to build, and was paid forby local donors with a matching grant from the Eli Lilly Drug Company.At a celebratory banquet given for the generosity of the community, Dr. Torian suggested to the Sewanee Woman’s Club the formation of a Women’s Hospital Auxiliary to serve all the work of the hospital.

Just in time for the dedication of the Children’s Wing in 1951 the Auxiliary opened a Surprise Shop to benefit the hospital. Sales were held in Winchester for 10 days in Oct and May. The Auxiliary took A-B-C-D donations to sell in the Surprise Shops. A —Antiques, B — Books, C — Clothing, and D— doo-dads. The final sale was held in May 1966 after raising a total of $75,000 for the hospital during all the years of Surprise Shop sales.

In 1966, the Children’s Aid and Women’s Hospital Auxiliary came together to form the Emerald-Hodgson Auxiliary which continues till today. In 1967, the Auxiliary opened the Hospitality Shop in addition to the volunteer services rendered at the hospital. The first Hospitality Shop was located on South Carolina Avenue and in 1972 it moved to its current location on University Ave. Over the years, proceeds of the Shop’s sales bought equipment such as oxygen tents, new bed rails, heart monitors for the ambulances, the ER Pediatric Crash Cart, Jaws of Life for the Fire Department and many more pieces of equipment.

The Shop has been a presence on campus with monies from sales now going to scholarships for students who plan to go into the medical field, current hospital staff’s continuing education, and helping to furnish the renovated Physical Therapy department. To help ensure that as much money as possible goes to the scholarship program, the University underwrites some of the expenses, but a year and a half ago the Shop did have to pay to have its roof replaced. Again,thanks to the generosity of the community who donate to and buy from the Shop, the Shop has now reimbursed the University for its loan to replace the roof.

2020 has been a particularly trying year with the Shop being closed much of the time. The faithful volunteers who have staffed the Shop have missed greeting old friends and new students who come to make purchases or browse. We know our shoppers have missed the fun of finding a great deal on a needed or frivolous item. There is always a surprise waiting for the patient shopper! We do not know what the future holds for us but we hope we will be back in business in the not too distant future, and we hope you will be there to help us continue the Auxiliary’s business of giving back to the community. New volunteers are always welcome to be a part of the Hospitality Shop. When we are able to reopen, the Messenger will let you know. In the meantime, we ask everyone to keep safe and help the Domain keep Covid cases under control.

The Hospital Auxiliary Board of Directors, Joanne Atwood, June Coker, Pixie Dozier, Laurie Fisher, Elizabeth Koella, April Minkler and Susan Peek

Tennessee Selected for Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution Pilot Program

Program Will Inform Vaccine Delivery Logistics for U.S.

Tuesday, November 17, 2020 | 04:30pm

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Tennessee has been selected as one of four states to participate in a pilot program for delivery of the Pfizer Inc. COVID-19 vaccine now under development. This program is designed to address distribution challenges posed by requirements for ultra-cold storage of the vaccine.

“We have a robust plan in place for distribution of this vaccine, and we’re honored to be chosen to help establish a model for other states in providing COVID-19 vaccine to their residents once it’s approved,” said Tennessee Health Commissioner Lisa Piercey, MD, MBA, FAAP.

Tennessee will participate in the pilot along with New Mexico, Rhode Island and Texas, states chosen based on their differences in size, population diversity and immunization infrastructure. Lessons learned through this program will help support all states in development of effective immunization programs for this COVID-19 vaccine.

Once the vaccine is approved, Tennessee and other states participating in the pilot will not receive vaccine doses earlier than other states by virtue of the pilot. Pfizer expects to have enough safety data on the vaccine from ongoing trials before the end of November before applying for emergency use authorization. Pfizer is working with Operation Warp Speed and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to ensure that following approval, their COVID-19 vaccine can be provided to those most in need as quickly and equitably as possible.

TDH in coordination with other state and local agencies submitted an initial draft of the COVID-19 Vaccination Plan for Tennessee to the CDC on October 16, 2020. This plan will be modified as more is understood about the virus and the availability of approved vaccines currently in development. Tennessee is preparing to begin distribution of COVID-19 vaccine as early as December 2020.

TDH is working to onboard hospitals, pharmacies, clinics and other partners capable of storing vaccine and administering it to priority populations. TDH will ensure distribution of vaccination sites across all 95 counties, especially in rural counties and areas with high concentrations of people in vulnerable populations. Providers who wish to administer COVID-19 vaccine may find more information online at www.tn.gov/health/cedep/ncov/covid-19-vaccine-information.html.

​University Facilities Open or Closed Status

The University of the South concludes the on-campus portion of the fall semester Friday, Nov. 20. While about 40 students might remain on campus during the extended winter break, most College students will be away from Nov. 22 through late January. Classes are planned to start again Feb. 1, 2021.

University offices will be closed for two weeks, from Dec. 21, 2020, to Jan. 4, 2021.

The access to and hours of many university facilities will be adjusted during the break.

During the semester break, hours of operation at the Fowler Center will continue as they are currently.

During the winter break, the Fowler Center indoor tennis courts will be available to Sewanee Tennis Association patrons with access through the exterior doors of the courts. The number of participants is limited to 12 at one time, and current members of the coaching staff must be present.

Access to all other areas of the Fowler Center will continue to be limited to students, faculty, staff, dependents of faculty and staff, and university retirees and their dependents throughout the break.

The Fowler Center will close during the university holiday from the end of the day Sunday, Dec. 20, until Monday, Jan. 4.

duPont Library will remain closed to the public, but books can be borrowed and picked up from the front porch. Closed Dec. 20 to Jan. 4.

The Sewanee Inn is open to the public until Feb. 1, 2021.

Shakerag at the Sewanee Inn will be closed Thanksgiving Day, otherwise is open to the public.

Green’s View Grill is closed on Mondays, and will close from Dec. 21 through Jan. 1. Otherwise it is open with its current hours.

Stirling’s Coffee House will be open from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays from Nov. 30 through Dec. 18, and from Jan. 4 through Jan. 29. Stirling’s will be closed on weekends, and during the university holiday Dec. 21 through Jan. 3. (No walk-up orders; customers must call ahead or use the app.)

McClurg Dining Hall remains limited to students only.

The University Bookstore is open Monday through Saturday; it will be closed Nov. 26 and 27 for Thanksgiving and Dec. 24 and 25 for Christmas.

The SPO will be open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to noon. The SPO will close on Saturdays from Dec. 19 through Jan. 23, and will close for the Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s holidays. Hours will be more limited during the university holiday from Dec. 21 to Jan. 4.

TDOE Announces New PBS Content: Winter Foundations Bootcamp

Tuesday, November 17, 2020 | 02:43pm

Academic Instructional Videos Focus on K-2 Literacy and Math

Foundational Skills

Nashville, TN—Today, the Tennessee Department of Education announced a new series of academic instructional videos will begin to air on PBS statewide, focusing on K-2 literacy and math foundational skills. The Winter Foundations Bootcamp will begin November 30 and run through the end of January.

Families will be able to watch these instructional video lessons created specifically for Tennessee students on all six state PBS stations– WNPT Nashville, East Tennessee PBS, WCTE Upper Cumberland, WKNO Memphis, West TN PBS, and Chattanooga WTCI from 9 a.m. –11 a.m. CST. While the majority of lessons will focus on providing instruction for literacy and math for K-2 grades, programming will also include Pre-K lessons and science lessons for grades 3-5.

The schedule for the Winter Foundations Boot Camp can be found on the department’s website.

“The first few years of learning set the foundation for student’s education, which is why we are so grateful to our PBS stations for again stepping up to help us provide this ‘Winter Foundations Bootcamp’ with instructional videos created specifically for Tennessee’s K-2 students,” said Commissioner Penny Schwinn. “We know some of our learners have experienced large gaps in learning due the COVID-19 pandemic, so we are really thrilled these lessons foundational literacy and math skills will be available to families and students through public television.”

“In this season of gratitude, Tennessee Public Television is extremely thankful to be partnering with the Tennessee Department of Education on new lessons of teacher created content and distributed throughout the state in a designated at home learning block for our children and families, via public television,” said Becky Magura, President and CEO of WCTE. “This is especially important to those who may lack access to the internet. This continued initiative is a blessing to all and we are so very grateful to the teachers and school systems who are making it possible! All of the Tennessee PBS stations are here to connect to each community with quality, educational, non-commercial content for children and families 24/7!"

“Teaching children phonological awareness is the foundation to future reading success,” said Jan Gillum, Pre-K Coach for Murfreesboro City Schools. “To begin building this strong foundation, children need exposure and experience with discriminating sounds through rhyming, alliteration, manipulating syllables and recognizing initial, medial, and final sounds in words. My hope is that these videos give children and families the opportunity to practice these skills by learning rhymes, games, and family activities in engaging and playful ways.”

"The PBS mathematics videos provide students in grades K-2 the opportunity to develop foundational skills in mathematics in a fun and engaging environment,” said Virginia Mayfield, Senior Director of Mathematics, Science, and Fine Arts for the department. “Through literature, counting, number talks and more, students practice important skills while being engaged in the learning of mathematics. I am excited that the videos will be playing on PBS as they provide the opportunity for students across the state of Tennessee to have access to learning experiences that will help develop for each child a strong, solid foundational understanding of mathematics."

"I am excited to be a part of TDOE's video lessons! As a former kindergarten and first grade teacher, I know and value the importance of foundational reading skills for our youngest readers,” said Ashley Kelley, Northwest CORE ELA Consultant for the department. “These videos will give students many opportunities to practice those essential skills in exciting and interactive ways."

In response to COVID-19 school closures, the TDOE-PBS partnership launched April 6th. From June through August, the partnership continued with the Summer Learning Series and featured PBS LearningMedia programming that was specifically chosen for a continued focus on early literacy and math, aligned to Tennessee standards.

For access to additional resources related to reopening schools, visit the Tennessee Department of Education’s Reopening webpage: https://www.tn.gov/education/health-and-safety/update-on-coronavirus/reopening-guidance.html.


Franklin County School Closure

Active: 11/16/2020 – 11/27/2020

After meeting with my administrators today, I have come up with this as our plan for the next two weeks. Some schools are not affected at all, some slightly and 3 are in dire need of some adjustments.

1. Decherd, South and Huntland Schools will go to Distance /Virtual Learning beginning Wednesday of this week going through Thanksgiving week. (Decherd ESP will also be canceled beginning Wednesday and going through Thanksgiving) CDC at South and Decherd will continue this week only.

This will be for 5 school days & 13 total days out of the building. Teachers and staff will report.

Schools will have tomorrow to give students their work for the next 5 school days.
Lunch/Breakfast will be by drive thru at DES, South, and Huntland on Wednesday for 3 days food. You must contact your school nutrition manager or the Board nutrition by 8 am on Wednesday for Wednesday pick up between 10:30-12:30.
2. All other schools will join them by closing on Monday and Tuesday of Thanksgiving week in Distance/Virtual Learning days.
Also all schools will be "Deep Cleaning" on those days.
All staff will report to work on the days for Distance/Virtual learning. This also gives staff and students an opportunity to get as COVID free as possible.

Meals for Monday and Tuesday of Thanksgiving week can be picked up if you contact your school cafeteria manager or the Board office of nutrition by 8 am on Monday. Pick up time 10:30-12:30.

3. All elementary and middle school games will be canceled or rescheduled until after the Thanksgiving holiday.

4. CDC classes and all ESP sites will be canceled on Monday and Tuesday of next week at all schools.
Bus routes will run for all students who need to be picked up this week.
There is no perfect situation, but I believe we are doing our part to help control the COVID at this time.
Stanley K. Bean
Franklin County
Director of Schools

Franklin County School Nutrition Office - 931/967-7635
Cafeteria Managers
Broadview 931/962-2320
Clark Memorial 931/967-0147
Cowan 931/967-6793
Decherd 931/967-9501
FCHS 931/967-9946
Huntland 931/361-0340
North Lake 931/455-9112
North Middle 931/967-0807
Rock Creek 931/361-0268
Sewanee 931/598-0016
South Middle 931/967-0948

COVID Testing Information

Extended Hours at Select Locations to Encourage COVID-19 Testing

Governor Bill Lee’s Unified Command Group is making more COVID-19 testing options available for Tennesseans statewide leading up to and just after Thanksgiving.

The Tennessee Department of Health and Tennessee National Guard will extend operating hours at 35 county health departments, from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., local time, on Monday, Nov. 23, and Monday, Nov. 30.The Franklin County Health Department will have these extended hours. A complete, statewide list of all COVID-19 testing sites is available at https://covid19.tn.gov/testing-sites/

Tennessee National Guard personnel will also support testing during extended hours at health departments in the Davidson, Hamilton, and Knox counties.

All 89 rural county health departments will be open Mon., Nov. 23, through Wed., Nov. 25. County health departments will be closed and will not provide COVID-19 testing from Thursday, Nov. 26, through Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020.

Participants should receive their test results within 72 hours, depending on test processing volume at laboratories. Information will be provided to participants at the testing locations on what they can expect after being tested. This information is also available at www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/health/documents/cedep/n...

The U.S. Center for Disease Control & Prevention has a guide available with recommendations for making Thanksgiving safer to prevent the spread of COVID-19 among family and friends. The guide is available at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/daily-li...

COVID-19 Testing Sites

The Tennessee Department of Health has COVID-19 assessment sites available across the southeast region.

There is free drive-thru testing available, Monday through Friday, at the health departments in Franklin and Grundy counties. Residents in Marion County may also call their local health department during regular business hours for assistance in getting tested.

Franklin County Health Department, drive-thru testing 9 a.m.–noon, Monday–Friday, 266 Joyce Lane, Winchester, (931) 967-3826.

Grundy County Health Department, drive-thru testing 8:30–10:30 a.m., and 1–3 p.m., Monday–Friday, 1372 Main St., Altamont, (931) 692-3641. Call ahead for an appointment.

Marion County Health Department, 8 a.m.–4:30 p.m., Monday–Friday, 24 East 7th St., Jasper, (423) 942-2238. Call ahead.

TN Division of Consumer Affairs Issues Scam Warning to Seniors

Tuesday, November 17, 2020 | 11:48am

Nashville - The Division of Consumer Affairs (DCA) in the Tennessee Attorney General’s Office is warning seniors to guard against scams designed to steal their personal information and money.

Toward the end of the year, certain scams reemerge. Especially in this time of COVID-19, while many Tennesseans may be separated from family, DCA is reminding both seniors and caregivers to be careful about how they share sensitive, personal information. Below is information about common scams.

Online Purchase Scams

Scammers often use fake websites to entice consumers with popular products at low prices. Research the business via an independent source first. Confirm the seller’s physical location. Consider your payment method when shopping online. Credit cards provide fraud protection to help you dispute charges for items that were not received.

Medicare Enrollment Scams

Callers claiming to be “Medicare Advisors” may be imposters attempting to steal your information and money. A true Medicare representative will call only if you are already a member of a Medicare plan. Representatives will already know your member number. Do not give out, verify, or correct your number for any caller.

Gift Card Scams

Imposters who use this tactic will call with a fake emergency and urge you to buy a popular gift card like iTunes, Google Play or Amazon and then demand the gift card number and PIN on the back of the card. That’s all they need to steal your money.

Grandparent Scam

The scammer calls and poses as a distressed grandchild or a law enforcement agent. There is a demand for a large amount of money to be sent through wire transfer or gift cards.

To file a consumer complaint, click here: https://www.tn.gov/attorneygeneral/working-for-tennessee/consumer/file-a-complaint.html

If you need assistance with a complaint, please call 615-741-4737 or email consumer.affairs@ag.tn.gov.

Click Scams, Schemes, and Swindles for more information.

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